twitter colorfb color

Current Ph.D. Students

Christopher Boyd

on . Posted in Current Ph.D. Students

Read more: Christopher Boyd

Chris Boyd
B.Sc.(Hons), Memorial University of Newfoundland
E-mail: This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

Supervisor: Dr. Duncan McIlroy

 

Chris graduated with his B.Sc. (Hons) from Memorial University of Newfoundland in April 2011. He did his honours research in three-dimensional morphological modeling of Ophiomorpha irregulaire burrows under the supervision of Dr. Duncan McIlroy. He started his graduate program in September of 2011. Chris has undergone two field sessions at various outcrops throughout north England.

Elizabeth Schatz

on . Posted in Current Ph.D. Students

Read more: Elizabeth Schatz

Elizabeth Schatz
B.Sc.(Hons), University of Saskatchewan
M.Sc., University of Saskatchewan
E-mail: This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

Supervisor: Dr. Duncan McIlroy

 

Elizabeth completed her B.Sc. (Hons) at the University of Saskatchewan. Her undergraduate thesis involved the study of a new Cruziana ichnospecies from diamictite deposits in a Late Paleozoic fjord environment of Western Argentina. Elizabeth continued her study of fjords into a M.Sc. where she focused on comparing the ichnology of the recent seafloor with Holocene core samples from three modern Baffin Island fjords.

Timothy Culwick

on . Posted in Current Ph.D. Students

Tim

Timothy Culwick


M.Earth Sc., Oxford Univeristy, UK
E-mail: This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

Supervisor: Dr. Duncan McIlroy

Timothy is a geology Ph.D student and Memorial University of Newfoundland. His Ph.D is exploring the potential of the biological chert of the Cow Head Formation in Western Newfoundland. Looking in detail at the exceptional biological preservation and the environmental conditions for required for this. His Masters thesis look at Lake Environments and their Potential for Life and Preservation in the Torridon of Scotland.